In a vase on Monday: pickin' in the rain

I'm sneaking in late again this week as we're just back from our trip to Ikara-Flinders Ranges National Park. Well...sort of... 

We knew there had been significant rain in the area and that access to some areas of the park might be difficult, however when we arrived, we found that most of the roads were closed. Undeterred, we decided to check out Rawnsley Park Station instead, which is located just before the entrance to the park, overlooking Wilpena Pound. It's a fabulous spot, with beautiful views and good facilities. We had been prepared to 'rought it', so having access to a hot shower felt very luxurious! The main downside, however is that as this area has been pretty extensively grazed, so we didn't get to see the wildflowers were hoping for. 

We returned home to a garden drenched by rain and with many plants in full spring bloom, including this gorgeous Leucospermum reflexum hybrid 'So Exquisite'. The 'Camp David' roses were also flowering, their blooms so heavy under the weight of the rain that they were flopping. I decided to cut a few for my vase, along with shrimp plant Justicia brandegeeana and foliage from Japanese flowering quince Chaenomeles speciosa, Spiraea cantoniensis and Plectranthus argentatus

Thanks as always to Cathy of Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the In a Vase on Monday meme. Perhaps you have a bunch from your own garden you would like to share too?

Here are a few pics of the landscapes around Rawnsley Park Station, for those interested.

Not a bad campsite!

Rock formation near Fern Tree Falls

Senna species


Shingleback lizard Tiliqua rugosa

Views over Rawnsley Park Station. Though pretty, unfortunately the purple flower is a serious weed, Echium plantagineum

Despite not gaining access to the National Park itself, we still has a great time. It was so wonderful to disconnect and get away.

Comments

  1. That's a beautiful arrangement, Horticat. The Justicia flowers give it a sense of fluidity and grace to balance the strong colors of the roses and Leucospermum. I'm hoping to find a Leucospermum reflexum hybrid here one day that doesn't require taking out a bank loan. I grew Justicia brandegeeana in my former garden but wasn't successful keeping it alive in my current garden. You've got me thinking I should try it again.

    The photos you took of your trip are wonderfully vivid. I love the shot of the rock formation and surrounding scenery in particular.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Kris, I hope you can find a Leucospermum reflexum hybrid that's not too expensive. 'So Exquisite' is particularly nice in my view as it has a very upright habit, with nice straight stems for cutting. I think it may have been bred specifically for the cut flower industry.

      Delete
  2. I am glad you had a good break despite the change of plan - how far from home did you have to travel? The leucospermum looks an amazing bloom and works well with the shade of red of the roses - love the backdrop too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Cathy, the place we traveled to is about 440kms from home (the very edge of the National Park). However, the park extends much, much further.

      The wall hanging belonged to my Great Aunt. I love it too - and it reminds me so much of her and her home, which was full of artifacts from all her travels. I believe the wall hanging is from South America.

      Delete
  3. What a lush arrangement, it speaks of volumes of rain. I wonder who's rose that is Camp David is the presidential retreat in the US? I love the Luecodendrons, but think they need a less humid environment than mine. I have the same Shrimp Plant in my garden, it is indestructible.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Amelia, I assumed the rose was named after the US presidential retreat, but I'm not sure. It has the most beautiful fragrance and is very disease resistant.

      Delete
  4. Beautiful arrangement--it sure looks like the plants all got enough rain.

    The area you visited on you vacation looks wonderful. I would love to visit Australia to see plants in habitat like Banksias and of course Eucalyptus.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Hoover Boo, yes there's so much to see here. The South West of Western Australia has particularly stunning and unique flora, especially after a good rainy season. Hope you can make it one day!

      Delete
  5. Gorgeous arrangement and thanks for the bonus photos! How big is that shingleback lizard? He's quite the stout fellow!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Loree, he’s a bit bigger than a foot long, but can get bigger. To me, he looks sort of like a prehistoric pine cone!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Gardening on one leg: what breaking my ankle taught me about my garden

In a vase on Monday: just in time

Garden Blogger's Bloom Day May 2022